fredag 12 juni 2015

Tommy Roe - Sheila (1st Album Rock 'n Roll/R&B US 1962)


270:- (24-Bit Limited Remaster Edition. Limiterad utgåva från OLDAYS Records. Endast detta exemplar i lager.)

"Sheila" is a song written and recorded by Tommy Roe with the help of Robert Bosch. The single reached number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 on September 1, 1962, remaining in the top position for two weeks and peaking at number six on the R&B charts.

The original version of the song was recorded by Roe for Judd Records in 1960 with his then backing group The Satins, but it failed to sell.


The song is done in the style of the Lubbock sound, made popular by Buddy Holly and the Crickets in the late 1950s; the strumming pattern, tempo and chords (both songs are in the key of A) bear particularly strong resemblance to the Crickets' “Peggy Sue.”

In 1969, Roe was presented by the Recording Industry Association of America with a gold record for accumulated sales of over one million copies.

Thomas David "Tommy" Roe (born May 9, 1942, Atlanta, Georgia) is an American pop music singer-songwriter.

Best-remembered for his hits "Sheila" (1962) and "Dizzy" (1969), Roe was "widely perceived as one of the archetypal bubblegum artists of the late 1960s, but cut some pretty decent rockers along the way, especially early in his career", wrote the Allmusic journalist Bill Dahl.

Roe was raised in Atlanta where he attended Brown High School. After graduating, he landed a job at General Electric soldering wires.

He had a Billboard number 1 hit in the U.S. and Australia in 1962 with the track "Sheila". A buildup of global sales of "Sheila" meant that the R.I.A.A. did not present the gold record until 1969. When "Sheila" became a hit, ABC-Paramount Records asked him to go on tour to promote the hit. He was reluctant to give up his secure job at GE until ABC-Paramount advanced him $5,000.


However in March 1963, the UK music magazine NME reported that he and Chris Montez had both been upstaged by The Beatles and their fans on a 21-day UK tour. Late that year Roe scored a Top 10 hit with "Everybody", which reached US number 3 and UK number 9, and "The Folk Singer" (number 4 UK) written by Merle Kilgore was also popular.

Following a more successful tour of the United Kingdom by his friend Roy Orbison, Roe toured there and then moved to England where he lived for several years. In 1964 Roe recorded a song written by Buzz Cason entitled, "Diane From Manchester Square." It was a story in song about a girl called Diane, who worked in an upstairs office at EMI House, when it was based in London's Manchester Square. 

Sales of this single in the UK were poor, and it failed to chart. During the 1960s, he had several more Top 40 hits, including 1966's number 8 "Sweet Pea" (number 1 Canada) and number 6 "Hooray for Hazel" (number 2 Canada). In 1969, his song "Dizzy" went to number 1 on the UK Singles Chart,[5] number 1 in Canada, as well as number 1 in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. This transatlantic chart-topper sold two million copies by mid-April 1969, giving him his third gold disc award.


Tommy Roe - Sweden EP 1962
Roe guest-starred in an episode of the American sitcom, Green Acres, called "The Four of Spades", which first aired on 8 November 1969, one week to the day before the Hot 100 debut of his final Top 10 single, a track co-written with Freddy Weller, "Jam Up and Jelly Tight", which became his fourth gold record, peaking at number 8 in the U.S. and number 5 in Canada.

A resident of Beverly Hills, California, he is married to Josette Banzet, an actress from France who won a Best Supporting Actress Golden Globe Award for her performance in the 1976 television mini-series, Rich Man, Poor Man.

In 1986, he was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame, and his pioneering contribution to the genre has been recognized by the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. Although his style of music declined in popularity with the 1970s mass market, he maintained a following and continued to perform at a variety of concert venues, sometimes with 1960s nostalgia rock and rollers such as Freddy Cannon and Bobby Vee.




Widely perceived as one of the archetypal bubblegum artists of the late '60s, Tommy Roe cut some pretty decent rockers along the way, especially early in his career -- many displaying some pretty prominent Buddy Holly roots. In fact, Roe's initial pop smash, 1962's chart-topping "Sheila," was quite reminiscent of Holly's "Peggy Sue," utilizing a very similar throbbing drumbeat and Roe's hiccuping vocal. 

The singer had previously cut the song for the smaller Judd label before remaking it in superior form for ABC-Paramount. 

The infectious "Everybody" -- another hot item the next year -- was waxed in Muscle Shoals at Rick Hall's Fame studios, normally an R&B-oriented facility (it's not widely known that Roe wrote songs for the Tams, a raw-edged soul group from his Atlanta hometown).

Once Roe veered off on his squeaky-clean bubblegum tangent, he stuck with it for the rest of the decade. His lighthearted "Sweet Pea" and "Hooray for Hazel" burned up the charts in 1966, and he was still at it three years later when he waxed his biggest hit, "Dizzy," and "Jam Up Jelly Tight.

Tommy Roe ‎– Sheila,  Album ABC-Paramount ‎– ABC-432, Mono US 1962 

01. Sheila (Written-By – Tommy Roe) 02:02
02. Piddle de Pat (Written-By – Tommy Roe) 01:53
03. Little Hollywood Girl (Written-By – Gerry Goffin, Jack Keller) 02:22
04. Heart Beat (Written-By – Bob Montgomery, Norman Petty) 02:00
05. There Will Be Better Years (Written-By – Tommy Roe) 02:10
06. There's A Great Day Coming (Written By – Smith) 02:07
07. Susie Darlin' (Written-By – Robin Luke) 02:17
08. Think About The Good Things (Written-By – Felton Jarvis, Tommy Roe) 02:04
09. Look At Me (Written-By – Buddy Holly, Jerry Allison, Norman Petty) 02:11
10. I Found A Love (Written-By – Bob West, Willie Schofield, Wilson Pickett) 02:56
11. Blue Ghost (Written By – Lagate) 01:59
12. Maybellene (Written-By – Chuck Berry) 02:20

Bonus Tracks:
13. The Folk Singer  02:51 (1963)
14. Everybody  01:56 (1963)
15. Come On  02:02 (1963)
16. Carol  02:28 (1964)
17. Party Girl  02:36 (1964)